Matching packet header fields

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The nft command line utility supports the following layer 4 protocols: AH, ESP, UDP, UDPlite, TCP, DCCP, SCTP and IPComp.

Matching transport protocol

The following rule shows how to match any kind of TCP traffic:

% nft add rule filter output ip protocol tcp

Matching Ethernet header fields

If you want to match ethernet traffic whose destination address is ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, you can type the following command:

% nft add rule filter input ether daddr ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff counter

Do not forget that the layer 2 header information is only available in the input path.

Matching IPv4 header fields

You can also match traffic based on the IPv4 source and destination, the following example shows how to account all traffic that comes from 192.168.1.100 and that is addressed to 192.168.1.1:

% nft add rule filter input ip saddr 192.168.1.100 ip daddr 192.168.1.1 counter

Note that, since the rule is attached to the input chain, your local machine needs to use the 192.168.1.1 address, otherwise you won't see any matching ;-).

To filter on a layer 4 protocol like TCP, you can use the protocol keyword:

% nft add rule filter input protocol tcp counter

Matching IPv6 header fields

If you want to account IPv6 traffic that is addressed to abdc::100, you can type the following command:

% nft add rule filter output ip6 daddr abcd::100 counter

To filter on a layer 4 protocol like TCP, you can use the nexthdr keyword:

% nft add rule filter input ip6 nexthdr tcp counter

Do not forget to create an ip6 table and register the corresponding chains to run the examples.

NOTE: the syntax mixing IPv6/IPv4 notation is not supported yet: '::ffff:192.168.1.0'

Matching TCP/UDP/UDPlite traffic

The following examples show how to drop all tcp traffic for low TCP ports (1-1024):

% nft add rule filter input tcp dport 1-1024 counter drop

Note that this rule is using an interval (from 1 to 1024).

To match on TCP flags, you need to use a binary operation. For example, to count packets that are not SYN ones:

% nft add rule filter input tcp flags != syn counter

More complex filters can be used. For example, to count and log TCP packets with flags SYN and ACK set:

% nft -i
nft> add rule filter output tcp flags & (syn | ack) == syn | ack counter log

Matching ICMP traffic

You can drop all ICMP echo requests (popularly known as pings) via:

% nft add rule filter input icmp type echo-request counter drop

Here is the list of available icmp types:

  • echo-reply
  • destination-unreachable
  • source-quench
  • redirect
  • echo-request
  • time-exceeded
  • parameter-problem
  • timestamp-request
  • timestamp-reply
  • info-request
  • info-reply
  • address-mask-request
  • address-mask-reply